Dec 122009
 

I couldn’t resist the siren calls of Anna Maria Horner’s Little Folks Voile.  The prints all arrived and the solids are on their way.  This is how happy I was when it got here!  Seriously so excited!!!

Made with Anna Maria Horner's Little Folks Voile

(Back it up!  Back it up!  What is Voile?  It’s a light weight woven fabric (this is 100 % cotton) that is has a wonderful drape (hangs nicely) and gathers particularly well.  For this reason, it is used often in garments (such as dresses, blouses and skirts) and also curtains.  The term apparently comes from old French and means veil. (Which is derived from latin and means covering.)  The fabric is lightweight and a bit shimery and silky.  The lighter prints are somewhat transparent, so you’ll want to layer them with another fabric (such as the solid colors, once they arrive) underneath if you’re using them for garment construction.  You don’t need to do this with the darker prints, unless you want to!)

It’s true that I have a LOT to get done before Christmas – but I knew I had to test this out.  So I made myself a shirt.  I used Jennifer Paganelli‘s (Sis Boom) Meaghan Peasant pattern – but I modified it by extending the shirt top, rather than attaching a “skirt” portion at the bust line.  Hmmm – I should have taken pictures.  Anyway, I liked the pattern – so I’ll probably make it again and then I can take some pics.  I wore the shirt tonight and it was comfortable!  Oh, and the print is called  Baby Bouquet in the Meadow colorway.

What I really wanted to tell you about was sewing with the voile.  It really is so buttery soft.  I know that because this is a new substrate (Anna Maria used this term often at quilt market – so I had to throw it in there.  And by the way, Anna is not the only one introducing new substrates to the US fabric/quilting companies….more on that later!) many of you are questioning if you will be able to use it.  What changes will you need to make?  Will you need special presser feet or other tools?  For this shirt, the only change I made was to shorten my stitch length.  I started out with my machine’s normal length (which is 2.5) and felt the fabric just slipped around a little too much.  So I took the stitch down to a 2.0.  For me, this was the only change I made….well other than pinning well.  And I suppose you should always pin – I just get lazy or in a hurry or something.

I will continue to work with this and let you know any trick and tips I come up with.  I’m going to work with it on my serger as well as shirring to see what other adjustments (if any) need to be made.  And if you’re ready to take the plunge and start working with voile yourself, use the code LITTLE for 20% off the voiles in my store for the next week.

All for now – but much more voile talk coming your way!